Navy and Marine Corps Medal of Honor

 
The Marine Corps has issued 298 Medals of Honor from 1862 to 1973 (This includes awards for Viet Nam issued at a later date). This number pales to the 2,318 that the Army has presented but skyrockets when compared to the 1 that the Coast Guard has issued. The Navy has issued 746 Medals of Honor, 60 to the Air Force for a total of 3,431 Medals of Honor issued in the history of America. Marines have received 8.7% of all Medals of Honor presented.
  
Below is a break down, war by war, rank by rank, posthumous to non-posthumous. To do this some basic understanding of the 298 is required. First, from WWI backward in history the citations did not report if the award was posthumous or not. This requires that except for counting how many went to officers and enlisted, they not be counted in the remaining stats. So be sure you remember that they are not part of any other numbers.
Stats for all Medals of Honor in the Marine Corps
Pvt
PFC
LCpl
Cpl
Sgt
SSgt
GSgt
1stSgt
2ndLt
1stLt
Capt
Maj
LCol
Col
MGen
60
47
14
40
44
11
9
1
9
20
17
15
4
6
1
Medal of Honor enlisted/officer stats: 226 Enlisted 75.8%   72 Officers 24.2%
Percentages by rank
20.1%
15.7%
4.7%
13.4%
14.7%
3.7%
3%
.34%
3%
6.7%
5.7%
5%
1.3%
2%
.34%
The below stats are based on 180 Medals of Honor presented during WWII - Korea - Viet Nam. WWI and all earlier wars in which the Medal of Honor were been given have been excluded from these below stats because the posthumous status are not given in these older citations as they were in later citations.
Stas for posthumous/living awards by rank
Pvt
PFC
L/Cpl
Cpl
Sgt
SSgt
GySgt
2ndLt
1stLt
Capt
Major
Lt/Col
Col
MajGen
Number of MOH for WWII - Korea - Viet Nam (Excluding WWI and prior)
9
47
14
21
21
11
4
8
16
11
10
3
4
1
Number of non-posthumous Medals of Honor by rank
3
6
0
7
6
3
2
4
7
10
6
2
3
1
Percentage of non-posthumous MOH per total by rank
33%
12.8%
0%
33%
28.5%
27%
50%
50%
44%
91%
60%
66.6%
75%
100%
Percentage of non-posthumous Medals of Honor per total of 180
1.66%
3.33%
0%
3.88%
3.33%
1.66%
1.11%
2.22%
3.88%
5.55%
3.33%
1.11%
1.66%
.55%
Stas for posthumous/living awards by rank for Viet Nam
Pvt
PFC
L/Cpl
Cpl
Sgt
SSgt
GySgt
2ndLt
1stLt
Capt
Major
Col
Number of MOH for Viet Nam = 57 total
1
15
13
5
6
2
2
3
2
3
4
1
Number of non-posthumous Medals of Honor by rank
0
1
0
1
1
0
1
1
1
2
3
0
Percentage of non-posthumous MOH per total by rank
0%
6.67%
0%
20%
16.6%
0%
50%
33%
50%
66.6%
75%
0%
Percentage of non-posthumous Medals of Honor per total of 180
0%
1.75%
0%
1.75%
1.75%
0%
1.75%
1.75%
1.75%
3.5%
5.26%
0%
The MajorGeneral who received the Medal of Honor at that rank was:
 
MajGen Alexander Vandegrift
Medal of Honor 
1942 
CO 1stMarDiv
Solomon Islands
 
General Vandegrift went on to be the Commandant of the Marine Corps from 1 Jan 1944 -- 31 Dec 1947 as a four star general.
 
Here is his citation.
 
Navy and Marine Corps Medal of Honor
MajGen ALEXANDER VANDEGRIFT
Medal of Honor 
1942 
CO 1stMarDiv
Solomon Islands
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the MEDAL OF HONOR to 
MAJOR GENERAL ALEXANDER VANDEGRIFT
UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS
for service as set forth in the following 

CITATION: 

For outstanding and heroic accomplishment above and beyond the call of duty as commanding officer of the 1st Marine Division in operations against enemy Japanese forces in the Solomon Islands during the period 7 August to 9 December 1942. With the adverse factors of weather, terrain, and disease making his task a difficult and hazardous undertaking, and with his command eventually including sea, land, and air forces of Army, Navy and Marine Corps, Major General Vandegrift achieved marked success in commanding the initial landings of the United States forces in the Solomon Islands and in their subsequent occupation. His tenacity, courage, and resourcefulness prevailed against a strong, determined, and experienced enemy, and the gallant fighting spirit of the men under his inspiring leadership enabled them to withstand aerial, land, and sea bombardment, to surmount all obstacles, and leave a disorganized and ravaged enemy. This dangerous but vital mission, accomplished at the constant risk of his life, resulted in securing a valuable base for further operations of our forces against the enemy, and its successful completion reflects great credit upon Major General Vandegrift, his command, and the United States Naval Service. 
 
 

/S/ FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT 

The above was compiled by Ben Drake from public information made available by the public affairs branch, HQMC. Any errors are unintentional. February 2, 1999